“Blankets to spread love” -Abington girls honor mother’s memory by spreading kindness

Abington residents Angela, 18, Christina, 16, and Mia, 7, started Annie’s Kindness Blankets to spread love to others after their mother died.

Anna Burgess The Enterprise – Angela, Christina and Mia Varney spent their Sunday in the hallways of South Shore Hospital, delivering fleece Annie’s Kindness Blankets to the hospital’s youngest patients.The sunny, breezy day would have been their mother Anne Varney’s 38th birthday. Varney, of Abington, died by suicide two years ago.Her three daughters are on a mission now to spread their mother’s kindness to remind others they are not alone, Angela said.“I think this is so much better than doing nothing and just mourning the fact that she’s not here,” Angela said.Anne Varney was described as a loving wife to the girls’ father, Steven, and a wonderful mother and friend with an infectious laugh, but she had struggled with depression for years.When she died, the girls were devastated. As they dealt with their grief, they realized that reaching out with kindness would make their mother proud and help others who might be struggling.“Our mom was honestly like a one-in-a-million person,” Angela, 18, said. “She was the sweetest person ever, and I guess this started because we wanted to show how far niceness can get you.”“We thought of blankets because people can wrap kindness around themselves,” said the girls’ aunt, Barbara Buckley. “What Annie would have actually done would be hug people until they felt better.”For more than a year now, the three girls have led the effort to spread kindness and caring, helped by Buckley, her daughter Aubrianne, and her friend Lisa Palmer.Mia, 7, Christina, 16, and Angela have given out nearly 1,000 blankets to area hospitals, homeless people and anyone who reaches out via their Facebook page. Blankets have been sent to the Ronald McDonald House in Texas, to Portugal and to Australia.Mia said she especially likes giving the blankets to sick children. Asked why her family started the project, Mia said, “so it can make people better.”Into every blanket, their grandmother Maryann Hall sews a message of kindness, reminding the recipients they are loved.Buckley said hundreds of recipients have expressed their gratitude. One woman struggling with depression said receiving the blanket saved her life.“It shows someone you care and you’re supporting them,” Christina said. “Even if it’s just a blanket, it goes a long way.”The girls also made a depression and suicide awareness video in which they remind people they are loved and would be missed if they were gone.“This is our never-ending story,” their message in the video reads. “It is our goal to never make it yours.”Asked if they were happy with how they spent their mom’s birthday, Angela and Christina answered together, “definitely.”“I love doing this,” Angela said. “I wouldn’t want to spend it any other way.”

This maths teacher impresses students with most genius April Fools prank ever

Matthew Weathers decided to take the opportunity of April 1 silliness to show of his technical skills to his students.

The prankster wrote on the white board “by mistake” and proceeded to Google a “solution” to his error. A YouTube video featuring Mr Weathers himself pops up and hilarity ensues.

The online professor attempts to use his sleeve, a cat and cleaning fluid to erase the marker – all to no avail.Finally, it’s a Star Wars light sabre that is thrown “threw the screen” to the classroom teacher that saves the day.

“I’ve done this kind of thing several times,” Mr Weathers told independent.ie.”Readers on Reddit have requested that I do a “behind the scenes” video, so I’ll work on that during Easter Vacation and post that in a couple weeks.”

For the April Fools prank, the class is suitably impressed; take a look at the genius here.